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2019, Wildlife
Click on image for caption

First Place Wildlife: Mark Knott – This leopard was resting in a tree. As we quietly approached it slowly opened its eyes and stared directly at us. Those eyes seem to look right through you.Second Place Wildlife: Jamie Pham – This curious young mountain gorilla in Uganda’s Bwindi Impenetrable Forest surely knew how cute he was when striking this pose.Third Place Wildlife: Don Fishman – I took this photo at Tubu Tree Camp in the heart of Botswana’s Okavango Delta. The game viewing was incredible and we witnessed this spectacular moment of lion versus buffalo.
Joseph James – We were watching ‘Boswell’ who is one of the biggest stars in Mana Pools when he decided to take a dust bath. He turned right at us just as he was rubbing the dust out of his eyes.Chris Swindal – Despite to look of rain, we found two lionesses walking to the west, just as a break in the clouds allowed the sun to peak through against a backdrop of the dark storm clouds to the east. It was stunning.Chuck Kossman – Large crocodile (estimated 14 feet) in the Mara River attacks a young zebra after passing through a large column of adult wildebeests.. It carried it downriver and parked it on the shore and returned to hunt again.
Azira Manchester – Tusker, the elephant, was peacefully grazing his dinner as we approached him closely. He greeted us gently and through his eyes, I felt the complete serenity. Mana Pools, Zimbabwe.Chris Swindal – This was captured as a zebra charges ahead across the Mara River from the Serengeti into Kenya’s Maasai Mara. The crossings are treacherous and at the end, some will die from being stampeded or eaten by a croc.Bob Blackney – I have read AAC’s newsletter ‘The Galloping Gnus’ but I never thought I would come face to face with one! In the Ngorongoro Crater this herd of Gnus came running in our direction with their distinctive trot and ‘Gnu! Gnu! Gnu!’
Susan Glessner – Cheetahs have semi-retracting claws giving them extra grip when they run. Moremi Reserve, Botswana.Bruce Gould – Silverback gorillas weigh approximately 350 and they spend most of their day foraging for food which includes leafy plants and bamboo. Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.Darlene Knott – The beautiful endangered wild dog is a special treat to observe. At MalaMala in South Africa, we followed a pack of 8 dogs as they rested, socialized and then killed and devoured an impala in a few minutes.
Mark Knott – This leopard had just moved away from feeding on a kill it had stashed in this tree. I’m amazed at how they can position themselves so gracefully among the branches to rest and watch.Jessica Loding – Rhinos are herbivores and are characterized by their thick protective skin, small brain, and large keratin horn. MalaMala Private Game Reserve, South Africa.Jessica Loding – Our first sighting of a Cape Buffalo, highlighted in blue. Horns can grow four feet wide and the prominent thick area of the horn is known as the ‘boss’. MalaMala Private Game Reserve, South Africa.
Michael Rhine – We did not spot this male lion camouflaged in the dry Mara grass until we were right upon him. Our presence did not seem to disturb this majestic creature who appeared to be deep in thought. Maasai Mara, Kenya.Jennifer Stopher – One of my favorite photos! As we approached a water crossing this hippo made his presence well known as he stood up and moved quickly out of the water. He was not happy to be disturbed! Khwai Concession, Botswana.Chris Swindal – The guides at Namiri Plains said that there have only been 5 reports of these exceedingly rare melanistic servals in all of Africa and this is one of them. I was lucky that it made an appearance during my stay.
David Fleisig – We were lucky enough to see two crossings in the Northern Serengeti. We sat for half an hour or so then saw this crossing, deciding to take the leap or getting pushed and the stampede began.Susan Glessner – Lionesses work together to hunt and help rear cubs. They can weigh between 270 to 400 pounds. During a game drive in Hwange these two watched their surroundings and I imagined them thinking ‘Did you see what she is wearing?’Katie LeValley –We were invited within 35 feet from this black rhino under the watchful eye of Serengeti park rangers. We stayed perfectly quiet watching the rhino for more than 20 minutes as he grazed.
Mark Knott – The ‘play’ between this mother leopard and her nearly independent sub-adult cub got a little rough at times. It appears like the cub is trying to strangle Mom! Notice the retracted claws, indicating this is all in fun. MalaMala, South Africa.Michael Ferrucci – Our adventures in Rwanda began with a trek into the Virunga mountain forest where we encountered a family of golden monkeys. Their hair looked meticulously groomed and shined gloriously befitting of their ‘Golden’ namesake.Kerstyn Countryman – This photo was challenging to take, the entire herd was jumping at different spots along this creek and most of my pictures turn out blurry. This reedbuck was the very last one to jump and I got it!
Darlene Knott – At MalaMala, this Cape buffalo, who appears to be a ‘Dagga Boy’, showed us his stuff! All the wrinkles, the textures and yes even his tongue and teeth were displayed as we quietly appreciated his unique ‘classic beauty’!Kerstyn Countryman – This group of elephants meandered their way into our camp! They were walking around the steps and one big guy broke the railings on one of the walkways! It was incredible to see them at such a close distance!Mark Knott – This impressive male lion was constantly being pestered why flies as tried to rest. We laughed at his funny expressions as he kept shaking his head and snapping at the pesky flies.
Chuck Kossman – Wildebeests exiting the Mara River. The Great Migration includes over 1.5 million wildebeest, 200,000 zebra and other antelope. The animals travel in a circle from the southern Serengeti north into Kenya’s Maasai Mara.Binita Kwankin – This leopard is called ‘Mama Kaingo’ by Kaingo Camp guides in Zambia’s South Luangwa National Park. She was stalking through the brush, staring intently at something we could not see. It was another female leopard who eventually came intoLeonard Kuo - We entered a small clearing with 20-30 chimps playing in the trees on the other side. Unlike the others this older chimp was calm and relaxed and just happy to watch the excitement below. Kibale, Uganda.
Alex Kostich – The hippo is by far the most intimidating of the creatures we saw, by sheer size and temperament. I was able to get this one in a split second, the definition in the teeth a source of pride for!Joseph James – Our first morning in Mana Pools, our guide took us on a long drive along a dry river bed where we found one of the park’s iconic elephants ‘Impy’ pulling down branches. We were able to get very close to him.Darlene Knott – Seventeen hyena gathered around this lioness who ignored them until one ventured too close. She somersaulted the hyena on the ground and took a bite out of it. A brave hyena distracted the lioness long enough to allow the injured to escape
Kerstyn Countryman – The wild dogs went to the den of another pack and we thought that they had eaten the pups. Later we found out that they kidnapped this pack's pups but the two packs are related and joined together.Mark Knott – ‘Sometimes You Just Want to Scream!’ We were so close to this resting lion that when he opened his mouth to snap at some bothersome flies all I could get in my camera frame was his impressive head.Darlene Knott – We followed a mother cheetah and her sub-adult cubs in the Maasai Mara. We saw them hunt, hiding under bushes lurking near impala, make the kill and devour a newborn Thomson gazelle.
Mark Knott – We were observing the interaction among a small pride of lions when the male began roaring. One of the prides females then got top and joined him making a roaring duet. Lions roaring up close is really impressive.Leonard Kuo – Up close and personal with an alpha silverback gorilla in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. We were no more than 3 meters away and hypnotized by his eyes.Katie LeValley – Black rhinos are browsers and have hooked lips whereas white rhinos are grazers and have a flat mouth. Serengeti, Tanzania.
Kerstyn Countryman – Our guide saw a plume of dust so he raced us over there and these two zebras were fighting. I took about 100 pictures and I got maybe 3 good ones! I am super proud of this photo!Bruce Gould – One of the greatest risks wildebeest endure during their migration is crossing the Mara River. Many perish by being trampled or eaten by crocodiles. Northern Serengeti., Tanzania.Jessica Loding –We visited this leopardess several times over 3 hours hoping her two cubs would show up to share the impala snack she had saved for them on the tree branch. MalaMala, South Africa.
Azira Manchester – One of my highlights in Mana Pools is canoeing on the Zambezi River. Calming water surrounded by the dunes, the wildlife and the dramatic blue and amber colors along the horizon have a very soothing effect on one’s soul.Brad Nichols – Two one-year old cheetahs on a termite mound. Cheetah hunt by vision rather than by scent. Termite mounds offer an elevated vantage point to seek out prey. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.Darlene Knott – In the Maasai Mara, a lioness was left alone by the pride with the remains of a wildebeest kill. Seventeen hyena and at least six jackals gathered around hoping to grab a morsel. One hyena took a chance and got too close.
Alex Kostich – We were especially lucky to find these two lions in heat. This encounter pictured lasted only about 10 seconds, but the drama and physicality of the moment really came through.Leonard Kuo – An imposing silverback mountain gorilla in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. There was an anxious moment when he walked straight towards me and brushed my arm as he passed by.Jessica Loding –This rhino did not seem to notice that we were there or that the oxpeckers were doing their job cleaning off the insects living on his skin. Tanda Tula Game Reserve, South Africa.
Joseph James – The chance to get out of the truck and get close to these iconic wild dogs on their terms truly brings the entire safari experience to an entirely new level, this is why we came to Mana Pools.Mark Knott – A wonderful sighting of a mating pair of leopards on a scenic rock outcropping in the Serengeti. I was so engrossed in watching them that I don’t notice the third ‘ghost leopard’ shadow until looking at the pictures later that evening.Katie LeValley – In the middle of the day, we passed by this lion sitting right next to the side of the road in the Serengeti. A lion’s mane helps them look more intimidating as well as protecting their necks during fights.
Joseph James – ‘Boswell’, one of Mana Pools famous elephants, slowly walked towards a new tree to terrorize. I really liked the background of green with the small herd of impala behind him.Mark Knott – This cheetah, one of a coalition of 2 brothers, was probing a herd of wildebeest looking for weakness or a calf. After making a couple of fake maneuvers they were unsuccessful this time at finding either and moved on.Jessica Loding – Leopards are known for their climbing skills and spend much of their days lounging in the crook of trees. MalaMala Private Game Reserve, South Africa.
Jamie Pham – It had been raining all day during our highly anticipated chimpanzee trek in Kibale National Forest in Uganda. We waited and finally, this male chimp came down from high above in the trees. It was a moment I will never forget.Michael Rhine – We were lucky to have such a clear view of Mount Kilimanjaro during our brief stop in Amboseli National Park. This lone elephant was kind enough to pose for a portrait.Michael Rhine – The hyenas closed in on a wildebeest carcass after the lions were done feeding. This hyena didn't seem to be in a mood for sharing. Maasai Mara, Kenya.
Bob Sabo – Canoeing on the Zambezi River in Zimbabwe’s Mana Pools National Park was an absolute highlight! Although a plant eating mammal, hippos are one of the most aggressive animals in Africa.Bob Sabo – We spotted this serval walking through some grass and as we drove near it, it began to hunt. I was able to snap this picture as it pounced on a small bird. Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe.Jamie Pham – A powerful, and at the same time intimate moment, with this African elephant in Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National Park. This composition is exactly as I envisioned when I captured it.
Chris Swindal – Three of my favorite camps in terms of abundance of great wildlife encounters (and in being relatively or completely alone with them) , in no particular order are, Duba Plains, Naboisho, and Namiri Plains.Mark Knott – An adult white bull rhino is an intimidating animal at any time, but up close in the dark they are truly impressive. MalaMala Game Reserve, South Africa.Mark Knott – I really like this sighting as the great lighting clearly shows the beauty of the leopard and its muscular form. It looked ready to spring even when simply drinking.
Michael Ferrucci – Humans are the main predator to the golden monkey as they encroach on the habitat, set snares and illegally cut down bamboo.Dawn Lotshaw – Tree climbing lions can be spotted in various parks in East Africa including Lake Manyara, Queen Elizabeth National Park and the Serengeti where this photo was taken.Michelle Wahlquist – A pack of wild dogs hunting red lechwe and during the chase, the dogs rounded a bend and ran smack into several elephants. It was hard to tell who was more startled, the dogs or the elephants!
Chris Swindal – The one with the dark mane is BJ (aka Bob Junior). He is the son of ‘Bob Marley’ (so named because his mane was full of dreadlocks), and he was one of the most famous lions in the Serengeti.Mark Knott – Witnessing a herd of wildebeest crossing the Mara River is one of the most amazing wildlife experiences you can encounter. Up close it’s all tightly packed bodies, horns and mass confusion.Brad Nichols – Leopard numbers at Mombo Camp in Botswana’s Moremi Reserve have always been high. Some, like ‘Legadima’ and ‘Pula’, have become legendary through documentaries such as ‘Eye of the Leopard’ by Dereck and Beverly Joubert.
Chris Swindal – ‘Selenkei’ is one of the most successful female cheetahs on the Maasai Mara in terms of successful hunts and raising her cubs to adulthood. Here wildebeest rally to chase her for a change.Michelle Wahlquist – A young elephant showing us who is boss, Moremi Game Reserve, Botswana.John Lotshaw – Wildebeest take the plunge crossing the Mara River in the Serengeti. The great migration moves in a clockwise direction and covers over 1800 miles across the Serengeti and Maasai Mara.
Jessica Loding – This group of young siblings seemed to have so much fun play fighting and rolling around. The young male to the left soon joined in the frolic. MalaMala Private Game Reserve, South Africa.Jennifer Tanaka – This blackback gorilla was very playful and dramatic at first and then decided he would lay down and daydream for awhile as we all watched him. I was approximately 10 feet away from him when I took this photo.Chris Swindal – Over 200,000 zebra and gazelle join the wildebeest in their annual migration across the Serengeti and Maasai Mara. We witnessed hundreds congregate near the river waiting to cross. Serengeti, Tanzania.
Michelle Wahlquist – This lone lioness was soaking in the early morning sun. Moremi Game Reserve, Botswana.Jessica Loding – This is the face of a survivor. He is scarred and missing an ear but he is still feisty so we did not linger to watch him. MalaMala Private Game Reserve, South Africa.Binita Kwankin – In Botswana’s Moremi Reserve this cheetah family lounged on the termite mounds and played in the grass, and she occasionally climbed atop the termite mounds to scan the horizon.. A beautiful and peaceful experience.
Brad Nichols – A leopard’s distinctive dark spots are called “rosettes” and the pattern is unique to each leopard. Chitabe Lediba Camp, Moremi Reserve, Botswana.Jennifer Tanaka – Gorillas have a unique nose print that researchers use to identify individuals.Kerstyn Countryman – This was one of the two brother lions on a 2-3 day old Cape buffalo kill (which smelled awful). The wild dogs kept trying to distract the two lions off the kill so they could grab some. It was fun to watch.
Binita Kwankin – We were at the Mashatu photography hide and herds of elephants were coming to the waterhole to wallow in the mud. This magnificent male elephant was enjoying making as much of a splash as he could! Humbling to be that close.Susan Glessner – During our safari we learned that cheetah are the only big cats that can’t roar. Moremi Reserve, Botswana.Chuck Kossman – Mara River crossing by a group of approximately 500 wildebeests and 60 zebras; they had spent the preceding 2 1/2 hours staging along the river's edge, making 7 aborted starts, before committing to the crossing. Northern Serengeti.
Michael Rhine – We followed this female leopard for about an hour one morning as she stalked several impala. They eventually caught wind of her presence and fled, dashing our hopes of witnessing an elusive leopard kill. Lewa Conservancy, Kenya.Jessica Loding – An elephant’s large ears are crucial for temperature regulation. The slight breeze created helps cool the blood that enters the ear before circulating back into the body. MalaMala Private Game Reserve, South Africa.Bruce Gould – During our gorilla trek, we visited one of the larger groups and witnessed 18 members out in a clearing, enjoying a sunny day. Volcanoes National Park., Rwanda.
Mark Knott – We watched a herd of wildebeest crossing the Mara River when suddenly the herd changed their path and came running from the river directly towards our land cruiser. It was amazing having them so close all around us.Michelle Wahlquist – The landscapes of Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe are so diverse and beautiful. While driving through a forest of acacia and mahogany, we came across this elephant snacking on acacia pods.Chuck Kossman – Leopardess, whose 2 month old cub was on the ground when a hyena appeared 20 meters in front of the mom. She sent the cub into a nearby tree, growled loudly and bared her teeth. The hyena retreated. Quite a show.
Binita Kwankin –This honey badger had taken to joining us at our mobile camp during pre-dinner drinks and snacks. He trotted past us as we sat around the fire, and started digging for termites in a log just a few feet away. Moremi, Botswana.Chris Swindal – Late one afternoon we were surprised by a serval as it trotted by near our vehicle. It came and went in just a handful of seconds but I managed to get a shot as it went by. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.Michelle Wahlquist – Like a human swatting at mosquitos, this young elephant repeatedly chased ‘pesky’ baboons away from Chris’s pan in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe.
Ed Wyatt - We came upon this lion as we entered the ridge road around Ngorongoro Crater in our safari vehicle and we followed it for a while. He walked with us like we were part of his pride. A beautiful animal.Chris Swindal – We trailed the herd all morning as they moved from one crossing point to another, deciding each time that it was not right. Finally in the afternoon they started going near crossing point #7. Serian Serengeti Lamai Camp.Brad Nichols – The elusive caracal is an efficient hunter and can take down prey two to three times its size. The tufted ears are a prominent feature on these stunning cats. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.
Mark Knott – One afternoon in Amboseli National Park we watched as two teenage bull elephants sparred to determine dominance. This sparing went on for about 30 minutes at times getting pretty heated.Brad Nichols – Botswana’s Okavango Delta and the periphery of the Moremi Reserve are rich with wildlife including a healthy leopard population. Chitabe Lediba Camp, Botswana.Linda Fore – A juvenile gorilla pauses from play atop a bush. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda.
Jeff Helitzer – We spotted this bright green little chameleon while driving through Sabi Sand. He froze in the middle of the street as we approached him, which made him a great model!Lalo Gutierrez Gilling - During a game drive in the Serengeti we saw this cheetah mom standing on a termite mound to search the plains for more food of her family.Lugena Wahlquist – On the way to camp there were 5 wild dogs! Such excitement for all of us. They were just starting to play and then chased a water buck. Riley, age 10, shouted ‘This is the best day of my life!’
Jennifer Tanaka – We encountered this dominant silverback in Rwanda. It was a cloudy, rainy day and the gorillas were quite active in spite of the weather. He was a very docile, gentle, and pensive gorilla and seemed to like to pose for pictures.David Baron – Magnificent elephant even with only one tusk in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania. This animal demonstrated dignity in the absence of dentistry!Darlene Knott – Klipspringers have to be some of the most agile creatures in this world. We spotted two of them at ground level, a rarity! After a battle with insects, they ascended the kopjes. Jumping rom rock to rock with ease!
Brad Nichols – The Serengeti has one of the largest lion populations in Africa with approximately 3,000 lions living in this eco-system. Namiri Plains, Tanzania.Darlene Knott – One of the sub-adult cubs of the Emsagweni female. We had watched this leopard and his two siblings as tiny baby cubs the summer before, so it was especially gratifying to see this one doing so well as a sub-adult.Bruce Gould – Golden monkey are social animals, living in groups of 30 to 80 individuals. Females are always with their troop whereas the males are more transient. Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.
Joseph James – The great elephants of Mana Pools are just one of the many reasons why people should visit this remote and spectacular national park in Zimbabwe.Jessica Loding – Leopards are carnivores but they aren’t picky eaters. They will prey on antelope, baboons monkeys and even reptiles such as snakes and monitor lizards.Darlene Knott – There were two male lions, brothers in a coalition, both interested in mating with the same lioness. This male was left out completely straggling sadly behind. Maasai Mara, Kenya.
Brad Nichols – The majesty of the endless motion of the great wildebeest migration. Singita Sabora Tented Camp, Grumeti Reserve, Tanzania.Darlene Knott – In the Northern Serengeti, we watched several wildebeest crossings. Here a small herd of wildebeest leaped into the Mara River to cross with a great deal of enthusiasm and a lot of fear for the giant crocodiles that lurk in the waters!Linda Fore – After climbing to a lush mountain meadow, this silverback allowed us to enjoy his family of 19 gorillas, consisting of infants, juveniles, females, and even a black back. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda.
Chuck Kossman – Mother and juvenile cheetahs on a small mound, looking for prey. Tarangire National Park, Tanzania.Katie LeValley – We came across a herd of Cape buffalo during the heat of the day in the Ngorongoro Crater. They wallow in the mud to cool off and get rid of parasites and bugs.Michelle Wahlquist – Coming across one honey badger on safari is an incredible stroke of luck. We could hardly believe our eyes when we came across two, at the same time! Khwai Concession, Botswana.
Ray Arvay – On our first game drive in Samburu we were struck by the high desert similarities to our home in Arizona. Enjoying the panorama, this giraffe posed perfectly. Its coloring was highlighted by the surroundings.Michael Ferrucci – Rwanda’s golden monkey is a subspecies of the blue monkey found only in the bamboo forests of the volcanic mountain chain that forms a part of the boundary between Rwanda, Uganda, and DRC.Ann Slaughter – This photo was taken in the MalaMala Game Reserve, on our first game drive upon arriving at Main Camp. This beautiful leopard was relaxing in the shade, surveying the world.
Kevin Allen – While we saw numerous elephant families in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania, this was the only family of ‘red heads’ that we noticed.Chris Swindal –Mother cheetah with three of her four sub-adult 'cubs'. They are old enough now that the guides expect her to leave the cubs at any time. The males will form a coalition whereas a female will be solitary.Susan Glessner – Vervet monkeys are omnivore, eating both plants and meat. They live in troops of 10 to 50 animals and are a constant source of entertainment in safari camps. Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe.
Lucie-Anne Dionne-Thomas & Andrew Thomas - This leopard had taken an impala up a tree earlier in the day and we returned later to see that the leopard had completely eaten the animal then proceeded to fall asleep…kind of like after Thanksgiving dinner!!Darlene Knott – In the Central Serengeti, we followed 2 cheetah brothers as they ventured through the tall grasses looking for food. One cheetah climbed atop the termite mound for a better vantage point to spot the prey animals.Chris Swindal – An opportunistic crocodile waits for some zebra as they cross the Mara River. Serian Nkorombo, Maasai Mara, Kenya.
Michael Kellogg – My brother challenged me to get a picture of a rhino. We came across 3 white rhinos, and I triumphantly texted. He texted back that only a rare black rhino counted. An hour later our guide spotted this one. Moremi, Botswana.Jessica Loding – We gave up our sundowner to follow three male cheetahs as they slowly made their back to Kruger NP. MalaMala Private Game Reserve, South Africa.Kerstyn Countryman – These waterbuck just happened to line up perfectly for this photo! Carol, my grandmother, said they were the only antelope with a target on their butt (pun intended).
Brad Nichols – Cheetah are daylight hunters and benefit from their incredible speed and spotted coats to camouflage against its prey. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.Michelle Wahlquist – What a special and memorable experience spending over an hour watching Matsebe, the ‘Queen of Khwai’ roam her territory and hunt geese in Khwai Concession, Botswana.Michelle Wahlquist – On our last game drive in Moremi we watched this pack of endangered African wild dog hunt an impala, only to have their meal stolen by a clan of 14 hyena. It was quite a battle that ultimately, the hyena won.
Megan Strobel – This female leopard, being a historically poor mother, had recently lost her cub and he was feared dead. This was the 4th day that he was missing but thankfully the frantic mom found him alive and well. MalaMala, South Africa.Linda Fore – This gorilla seems to ponder our presence on this steep hillside while he leisurely kicks back. Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, Uganda.Lalo Gutierrez Gilling - This photo was taken in Serengeti, very lucky to watch the mom killing a hare for the babies.
Traci Greenberg – While driving in the Maasai Mara, we came across this gorgeous male lion, seemingly hiding behind a tree. This gave new meaning to the moniker ‘Cowardly Lion.’Andrea Siy – We spotted this beautiful leopard on our very first game drive while staying at the Muchenje Safari Lodge. She stayed absolutely still in her tree watching what she hoped would be dinner without a care for her audience.Susan Glessner – The gestation period for a female elephant is 22 months and when the calf is finally born, it weighs an estimated 200 pounds. Okavango Delta, Botswana.
Jessica Loding – We were lucky to view such a beautiful animal. Leopards have very sharp eyesight and can spot prey at a distance of 1.5 kilometers (.93 mile). They also have keen sense of smell and hearing. MalaMala, South Africa.Traci Greenberg – On a full day game drive in the Maasai Mara, we came upon the ‘Topi Pride.’ This large lion family first took shelter from the sun in the shadow of our Landcruiser. Life is good when you’re the apex predator!Michael Ferrucci – I did not notice the oxpecker on the Cape buffalo at first! I was so fascinated by the calm expression on the buffalo’s face, as if he was getting a facial! Chobe River, Botswana.
Susan Kay – Our gorilla trek was magical! We delighted at the tender family relationships and antics of the young gorillas. The elder gorilla seems to be smiling at us. Returning at almost sunset, what an adventure!Susan Kay – We pulled over to view these zebras in the early morning. The light was magical and we wanted to stop every few minutes to capture breathtaking examples of Tarangire in the morning light!Todd Mahaffey – The hippo wallow in the Serengeti holds hundreds of hippos. The smell is quite pungent and cannot be described.
Aloise Zuchelli – Early morning safari in Tswalu with Juan, our guide, and Jonas, our tracker to find the rare black rhino. This was a female with a baby in tow.David N. – Our safari to Kenya included a stop in Samburu National Park where we spotted this spectacular leopard sleeping in a tree.Maya Dobrinsky – We were chasing a pack of wild dogs in the Timbavati region and met up with them just as they were tearing apart an impala. It was captured on an iPhone X as one of the dogs ran off with the head.
Andrea Siy – Quality time with the elephants at Vundu Camp in Mana Pools. This is ‘Boswell’ and he would give us quite a show while he ate his dinner - often even rising to his back legs to reach the tall branches.Kevin Allen – In the Northern Serengeti, after watching two female lions and their cubs this male lion appeared over a nearby hill. The lion stopped for a quick drink and then proceeded into some bushes never to be seen by us again.Susan Glessner – Pound for pound, the leopard is the strongest climber of all cats. They spend much of their time in trees from stalking prey to eating their kill. Okavango Delta, Botswana.
Lisa Gould – Giraffe are the most vulnerable when bending over to drink due to the precarious position they have to assume. Tarangire National Park, Tarangire.Kerstyn Countryman – The aardwolf breed of hyena is incredibly rare to see! We saw two sightings of them! The guides knew where his den was and took us right to him. He is very beautiful!Kevin Allen – Upon arriving at the Amboseli National Park Airstrip on the way to camp, Joseph, our guide, knew the elephant trails so he was able to position the jeep for us take classic photos of the elephants in a line.
Katie LeValley – We came across the leopard after getting an early start one morning in the Serengeti, and our guide spotted him hiding high up gazing out from a rock. Leopards are solitary and typically come together to mate.Linda Fore – Lesson learned, don’t block the Silverback’s trail. This roar came seconds before he charged us! We instantly cleared his path as he charged by and then calmly sat down and resumed eating. Point well made! Bwindi, Uganda.Chuck Bevins – On our first afternoon game drive at MalaMala Private Game Reserve we spotted this red-billed oxpecker hitching a ride on a white rhino grazing in the field.
Nancy and Conrad Cheung – During a morning game drive from our camp, Jock Safari Lodge in South Africa’s Kruger National Park, we spotted 6 or 7 lion scoping out impalas for their next meal.Jane Craig – On our drive into Little Vumbura, we came up on a small group of young elephants. This pair was play jousting right across our road. We stopped and watched until they’d had enough of each other and moved away.Bob and Marge Frank – We saw this female black rhino early one morning in Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Crater. This is one of the few places in Tanzania to spot these magnificent animals.
Aloise Zuchelli – This was an early afternoon shot of the sable antelope outside our lodge at the Motse at Tswalu. He was only about 50 yards away.Barbara Stott – Desert elephants travel long distances across harsh terrain with only seasonal rivers and limited vegetation for food. This elephant had just shaken the tree so he could get some pods to fall for a snack. Daramaland, Namibia.Barbara Stott – The water holes in Namibia’s Etosha National Park each has its own ‘personality’ and are favored by particular wildlife throughout the year. It was a warm day so lots of action at this particular water hole.
Leonard Kuo – After an arduous two and a half hour uphill rainforest trek in Bwindi Impenetrable National Park, our group arrived at a small clearing to see this young mountain gorilla lying on its back relaxed and completely unfazed by the new arrivals.Susan Glessner – Africa wild dogs live in packs averaging from 7 to 15 members. Within the pack there is a unique social structure. Moremi Reserve, Botswana.Carol Bailey – During my safari I loved talking to the guides and the camp staff and learning about all the different animal behaviors and their culture. I learned about the behavior of lions and elephants, all of which I am very interested in!
Bruce Gould – One of the ‘Big Five’, Cape buffalo in Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Buffalo can weigh between 660 to 1900 pounds.Erik Meyers – This juvenile gorilla in the Susa group was very interested in us. Young gorillas spend much of their day playing, climbing trees, chasing one another and swinging from branches. Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.Traci Greenberg – Our morning game drive was breath taking, with the mist burning off in the warmth of the rising sun, this giraffe seemed just as enamored as I was with the beauty of our surroundings. Naboisho Conservancy, Kenya.
Check Bevins – We rounded a bend and happened upon a pride of 23 lions. We parked for 90 minutes, experiencing in silence this amazing group. The time in their presence was so peaceful and surreal.Becky Douglas – One of Namibia’s desert elephants along the Huab River Valley. Adapted for desert conditions and walking in sand, they have smaller bodies and larger feet than the typical African elephant.Erik Meyers – One of the silverback males in the Susa group in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. Amazing how close you come to these incredible animals.
Aloise Zuchelli – Another great Tswalu sighting on the way to look at the lion pride in the late-afternoon. This white rhino was at a watering hole checking out a very old male lion that appeared to be at his end of life.Ann Badders – The leopard was taken during an afternoon game drive in central Serengeti. We had been watching a cheetah family when word came out of a leopard spotting, so we quickly drove over to see. Lucky us!!Ann Badders – While in Tarangire National Park, this was one of the first giraffes we had seen. It crossed in front of the jeep and started to eat from the tree. These animals are so large, yet so graceful in their movement!
Erik Meyers – In the Ngorongoro Crater we watched some wildebeest when Michelle sat down and looked out her window and realized there was a lioness 5-10 feet away in a bush also watching. She was face to face with this beautiful wild animal.Barbara Lyndrup – The mud wallow at Kigelia Camp in Ruaha NP. We spent an hour watching a herd of aunties, older siblings and calves joyfully spraying each other with black mud. Until a bull chased everyone out so he could enjoy his solitude.Nancy Siepman – Unexpected sighting of cheetahs!! We were told that the possibility of cheetah sighting would be very low in the area we were at. Surprisingly, our first sighting on this safari were cheetahs!! Moremi Game Reserve, Botswana.
Aloise Zuchelli – In Tswalu airstrip our guide gave us a treat of seeing the pack of wild dogs resting after their successful hunt the day before that we got to witness. The wild dogs are truly magnificent hunters.Carol Bailey – A number of vehicles were surrounding a cheetah when this rhino popped out of the bushes at Amboseli National Park in Kenya. We chose the rhino and saw several cheetahs later. I bet most of the people never did see the rhino.Joshua Dobrinsky – On a game drive we spotted this leopard on a termite hill in the Sabi Sand region of South Africa.
Carol Bailey – We noticed two zebras walking down the road and weren’t paying attention. The lioness charged and both zebra’s got away but the next morning the lioness was found in the same area with blood on her face.Bruce Gould – Adult gorillas eat up to 30kg a day in food with a diet consisting mainly of bamboo, fruit and leafy plants. As roaming herbivores, gorillas play a vital role in seed dispersal. Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.Traci Greenberg – Namiri Plains is cat country! We saw countless cheetahs, a leopard, and an elusive African wildcat. But the mating lions put on the best show of all, especially when viewed from our Serengeti bathtub behind our tent!
Jane Craig – We spotted this tiny Angolan reed frog on our afternoon mokoro at Little Vumbura (Okavango Delta) hanging on that reed close to the waterline. He was singing out his bell-sounding croak, looking for a female.Jay Berkowitz – During our stay at Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp in one of the most remote areas of Namibia’s Kaokoveld Desert, we were surprised the area was teaming with animal life including the most beautiful elephants we have ever seen.Carol Bailey – Our game drive had just started in the Maasai Mara, when we went around a corner and found this beautiful black maned lion resting by the road. He posed for several pictures before laying down to sleep.
Joshua Dobrinsky – Taken in the Sabi Sand region of South Africa at sunset. It was the dry season, so hippos were hard to find and we came across 2 that were just getting started on their evening activities.Dawn Lotshaw – Nature--unforgiving. A wildebeest pays the price for breaking its leg crossing the Mara River in the Northern Serengeti.Andrea Siy – Leopards are opportunistic hunters and owe their success to running at speeds up to 36 mph, carrying their kills up trees and its ability for complete stealth. Chobe River front, Botswana.
Cathy Code – During our time in the Okavango Delta we experienced leopards on a night drive, three cheetah chases with an impala kill, elephants swimming across rivers, exotic birds and the most colorful sunsets with hippos ever.Susan Franke – The photo was taken in Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Conservation Area, on our full day crater game drive. This lion had crossed our path, and was continuing to walk away from the road.Aloise Zuchelli – In Botswana at the Chobe National Park, we were able to get very close to a large herd of elephants. We got to see 2 young bulls jousting with each other for about 30 minutes, what a thrill to witness.
Jeff Helitzer – The Birmingham Pride’s famous white lion enjoying herself after a meal in the Ngala Private Game Reserve. Shortly after this she found herself fascinated by a shongololo crawling on the ground, watching it closely.Dawn Lotshaw – A hippo pod monopolizes a pool in Tanzania’s Ngorogoro Crater. During the day, hippos remain cool by staying in the water or mud and come out at dusk to graze and feed.Barbara Stott – We learned on safari that Namibia is one of the few countries in Africa with a growing giraffe population thanks in part to communal conservancies. Damaraland, Namibia.
Lisa Gould – Dominant silverback mountain gorilla seen during trek at Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.Bruce Krumland – I wanted to get a head-on picture of a big male tusker with big tusks and his ears flared out. This one happened at Amboseli - just for a sec before he turned off and the moment was lost.Barbara Stott – There is always something exciting on a game drive in Botswana. This leopard is looking a little wistful because a lion just stole her kill. Moremi Reserve, Botswana.
Kirk Beales – During our safari to Botswana’s Okavango Delta and our stay at Little Vumbura we came across these lion cubs that had just crossed a small waterway and were tussling together.Carol Bailey – The Cape buffalo is often found in large herds but this guy was alone and blocking the road at Lake Manyara in Tanzania. The red-billed tickbird eats ticks and other insects on the animals.Nancy Gubman – The trip to Ruaha and the Selous was just fabulous. I loved both Kigelia and Sand Rivers. 5 days each was perfect. Amazing food at both, great staff, great guides. Saw a lot of game.
Leonard Kuo – Leopard alert in the Northern Serengeti.David Rosenfeld – One of the excursions was a visit to Namibia’s famous Skeleton Coast and the sea lion colony. The four female seals seem to be posing and looking in different directions.David Rosenfeld – Taken at the photographic blind at Ongava Camp in Namibia. It was extraordinary to see how cautious the giraffe was, checking for 10 minutes in all directions before lowering himself into a vulnerable position to drink.