Photo Archives

Click Year to View Gallery

Winners

2018   -  2017   -  2016   -  2015

Wildlife

2018   -  2017   -  2016   -  2015

Babies

2018   -  2017   -  2016   -  2015

Scenery

2018   -  2017   -  2016   -  2015

Clients on Safari

2018   -  2017   -  2016   -  2015

People of Africa

2018   -  2017   -  2016   -  2015

Birds

2018   -  2017   -  2016   -  2015

Portfolio of Photos

2018   -  2017   -  2015   -  2013

2019, Babies
Click on image for caption

First Place Wildlife Babies: Chris Swindal – These tiny cheetah cubs were one of the highlights of my safari. We found them at Namiri Plains Camp, which is far away from any other camp, and we never saw another vehicle during the sightings.Second Place Wildlife Babies: Richard Berlin – A rare white lion cub spotted during a game drive from our camp, Ngala Tented Camp Game Reserve in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.Third Place Wildlife Babies: Darlene Knott – In the Maasai Mara, these two jackal puppies let curiosity get the better of them when they turned to stare inquisitively at the two of us snapping picture after picture of these adorable puppies!
David Baron – During our trek in Volcanoes National Park we witnessed a silverback's tolerance to his babies. This silverback is known as “Mr. Lucky”, head of the Hirwa Group.Mark Knott – Even rhinos like to snuggle up to Mom! You normally don’t associate rhinos with affection, but watching the way this baby snuggled up to its mother put them in a whole new light. He/She looks so contented.Mark Knott – We were driving along and spotted this lone lion cub resting is a tree. As we watched him he seemed as curious and amused by us as we were by him.
Chris Swindal – We just missed this giraffe being born by only a minute. We came around a corner and the baby was flat on the ground and had not yet tried to stand. We saw the whole thing from that point on. Very special!Traci Greenberg – Safari guides are encyclopedias of bush knowledge. You stand to learn so much, including the Swahili names of all the wildlife you will encounter. In honor of them, I simply call this photo ‘tembo TEMBO.’Jennifer Lindsley –The Mum walked slowly over to the tree, positioned herself at the base and looked up at the baby. Very slowly the baby came down the tree with Mum watching each step. Old Mondoro Camp, Lower Zambezi National Park, Zambia.
Kevin Allen - It rained before, during, and after the trek but fortunately stopped when we were with the gorilla group in Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. This mom and baby cuddled the entire hour that we were there.Chris Swindal – After a gestation period of 90-95 days, a female cheetah will give birth to a litter of 3-5 cubs. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.Kerstyn Countryman –We had yet to see any lion cubs at this point in the trip and our guides stopped on the side of a hill, not two feet away these little guys were playing! It shows how awesome the guides are at spotting animals!
Chris Swindal – Cheetah cubs will remain with their mother for up to two years. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.Chris Swindal – The proud mother with her 90 minute old baby, who was still wobbly, leaned against mom for support.Brad Nichols – The baby colobus monkey was not sure what to make of having its picture taken. Babies are born with white fur which gradually becomes darker and within three months they have the black and white coloration. Singita Sabora Tented Camp, Tanza
Cara Hobson – During a morning game drive at MalaMala Private Game Reserve, we came across two playful leopard cubs chasing and wrestling each other while their mom was away.Chris Swindal – Spotted hyena cubs are born solid black and they get their spots when they are a few weeks old.Chris Swindal – Two cubs nestle together and fall asleep against one of the lionesses. Namiri Plains, which means big cat in Swahili, really lived up to its name!
Bruce Gould – A baby elephant calf weighs about 250 pounds at birth and stands approximately 3 feet tall. They recognize their mothers by touch, scent and sound as they don’t initially see very well.Chris Swindal – During a game drive at Namiri Plains Camp in the eastern Serengeti we discovered this cheetah mom with five cubs. My guide estimated that the cubs were only 3-4 weeks old.Binita Kwankin – These hyena cubs were full of mischief and curiosity. They would try to approach as long as mom was nearby. This cub stopped to investigate us before dashing back to play. Mashatu Game Reserve, Botswana.
Michael Kellogg – This lioness had gone hunting the night before and secreted her cubs on a small island in the wetlands. We arrived just when she was picking them up and they were swimming behind her. Vumbura Plains, Okavango.Barbara Kligerman – The mother elephant with baby were moving along with the herd in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania and seconds after this were completely hidden.Chris Swindal – One of the reasons that cheetah are endangered in the wild is because of the high mortality rate of cubs. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.
Noreen Dobrinsky – While in the Sabi Sand region and we came across a female rhino and her baby – just weeks old. The baby was practicing charging at us and running all around like kids do. The mother was close behind it.Katie LeValley – Our first stop was Arusha National Park and we got the opportunity to see many amazing Colobus monkeys hidden among the trees. Seeing this young baby was so special, especially as part of our first day on safari.Binita Kwankin – This shy 3-month old leopard was tagging close behind its mother. This cub posed for a split second, before loosing its nerve and racing to catch up with mom. Its mom is the beautiful leopard called ‘Chiphadzuwa’.
Chris Swindal – As a large group of zebra cross, this youngster gets separated from its mother by the strong currents. Mara River, Kenya.Chris Swindal – After nearly 90 minutes after birth, the mother giraffe started to lead her baby away from the birth place. Naboisho Conservancy, Kenya.Alex Kostich – A highlight of our safari was a pride of 16 lions having a sunset drink at water hole. These two cubs captured my heart, and soon spread out in the mud to cool off and nap. My heart still sings over this experience!
Lalo Gutierrez Gilling - A large herd of elephants surrounded our car, but only the baby elephant was curious enough to touch our car with his trunk/nose. Tarangire National Park, Tanzania.Susan Glessner – This male lion watched his young cub between napping. Lions are the only cats that live in large, social groups called ‘prides’ which can have between 3 to 30 lions. Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe.Chris Swindal – At approximately 5 months old, cheetah cubs will play with one another, sharpening their stalking, chasing and wresting skills. This particular morning they were even more active than the previous days. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.
Katie LeValley – We stopped to watch a mother with her four baby warthogs. Our guide let us know how rare it is to see that many piglets because of all the natural dangers they face.Dara Schopp Helitzer – A mother and cub from the Eyrefield Pride in Sabi Sand Private Game Reserve. These three lions are the only ones left in their pride after a nomadic male wiped out the others.Chris Swindal – The cheetah cubs were a bit more active than the previous day, exploring further from mom who was still nearby and on the lookout for both danger and potential prey. Namiri Plains, Serengeti.
Chris Swindal – The herds of wildebeest had left the plains and were making their way toward the Mara River. There were thousands and thousands of them. A giraffe family watches them slowly march on.Megan Strobel – This young leopard inquisitively smelled the plants around our van. He ended up laying right under the vehicle to escape the heat. Mom was close by guarding an impala carcass in a tree. MalaMala, South Africa.Nancy Siepman – We spent one entire morning visiting a spotted-hyena den. The hyena cubs were very curious and playful. We also observed the hyena parents disciplining, nursing and caring their cubs. Mashatu Game Reserve, Botswana.
Chris Swindal – Cheetah are not considered skilled hunters until they are about three years old. These young cubs have a long way to go in training lessons with their mother. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.John Lotshaw – Mother elephant and her calf walks along a marsh in the Ngorogoro Crater. A female elephant endures 22 months of pregnancy before giving birth to its young. Calves weigh approximately 250 pounds at birth.Jessica Loding – We were fortunate to watch this lioness showing love and caring to her cub. Their noses are tinged in blood from feeding on a recent kill. MalaMala Private Game Reserve, South Africa.
Lugena Wahlquist – We were at Chris’s Pan in Somalisa when the baboons arrived for a playful adventure in and near the water. The baby was intrigued by looking into the water and the parent’s reflection can be seen in the photo.Lugena Wahlquist – We laughed as the elephants at Chris’s Pan in Hwange National Park gave us ‘The African Salute’. We so enjoyed watching them play in the water.Todd Mahaffey – Baby baboons are born with the instinct to grasp with their hands and feet.
Brad Nichols – The giraffe is one of the tallest, strongest and most peaceful animals on earth. Mombo Camp. Botswana.Carol Bailey – Our group was photographing lions at a kill in the Maasai Mara. I turned and saw these young lions patiently waiting their turn. I was able to get several shots before they laid down in the tall grass.Susan Glessner – During our game drives in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park we were delighted by the herds of elephants and watching the youngsters learning to use their trunks.
Chris Swindal – We found a large clan of hyena with their puppies. The puppies were very interactive with the adults and each other. An adult hyena watches a curious puppy walk closer toward us.Darlene Knott – We were driving in the Northern Serengeti when we came upon a tree with one tiny lion cub resting on a branch. He looked completely relaxed with us watching.Chris Swindal – This mother cheetah use a termite mound as a vantage point to look for prey as well as predators which might harm her cubs. Namiri Plains, Serengeti, Tanzania.
Cara Hobson – Elephants have over 40,000 muscles in their trunk and it takes babies time to learn to use these unique appendages. MalaMala Game Reserve, South Africa.Katie LeValley – Visiting in February, we had a lot of opportunity to see many baby animals during our safari. Zebras have a gestation of 13 months and foals are born with brown and white stripes. Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania.Brad Nichols – Namiri Plains Camp is located in Tanzania’s Eastern Serengeti and is known as being ‘big cat territory’ where cheetah, lion and leopard are frequently seen.
Michelle Wahlquist – This baby elephant was enjoying a little snack in a safe, shady spot. Moremi Game Reserve, Botswana.Susan Glessner – Lion cubs are born with brown rosettes (spots) on their fur which will fade with age. Hwange National Park.Leonard Kuo – This baby zebra would be less than a few weeks old. The photo was taken in the Maasai Mara in October during the annual migration where we were surrounded by thousands of wildebeest and zebras.
Darlene Knott – While the lion pride in the Maasai Mara ate on the wildebeest kill, the cubs played with and fought over the wildebeest’s tail. We watched their antics for quite a while and were thoroughly amused the entire time!Chris Swindal – A happy ending for the zebra foal who had been separated from its mother. The mother charged across the Mara River, through croc infested water, and reunited with its baby.Kristen Holding – The entire trip I was fascinated by the elephants and it was interesting to learn how the babies cannot use their trunks to drink until they are about a year. MalaMala Game Reserve.
Kerstyn Countryman – Our guide spotted these lion cubs from incredible distance and proves how skilled they are. I learned that cubs start to eat meat at about three months and are weaned at about six months.Lalo Gutierrez Gilling - In Tanzania’s Tarangire National Park, we were just starting our day and the first animal we see is a pride of lions including moms with their cubs. This was a very lucky day and best way to start it.Leonard Kuo – I had never seen a baby hyena before on previous safaris to East Africa. I came across this family in the Maasai Mara after a brief rain storm. It’s a shame that they grow into such ugly adults.
Jennifer Tanaka – This mama and baby elephant were part of a large herd of elephants traveling through the Park to a nearby watering hole. The baby was quite playful and enjoyed exploring. Amboseli, Kenya.Carol Bailey – Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Crater is a good place to find the black rhinos as well as many other types of wildlife. Black rhinos have a hooked upper lip in contrast to the flat, broad mouth of the white rhino.Erik Meyers – A mother mountain gorilla and her 4 month old infant. The maternal love and caring instinct was so evident in the expressions and actions of the mother. Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda.
Mara Perkins – We heard there was a leopard stuck up a tree surrounded by a pack of wild dogs. The poor leopard was perched up the tree and would have a long wait before escaping. MalaMala, South Africa.Bill & Fran Powell – During our stay at Ngala Tented Camp we saw the incredibly rare white lion cub. There are currently only three documented white lions in the world living freely in the wild. One can be seen at Ngala.Dick Swihart – A herd of elephants rushed to a water hole for a drink just as the sun was setting. This baby was so small it could not use its trunk, so it used its mouth to lap up the water like a dog. Tanda Tula, South Africa.
Dara Schopp Helitzer – A rare white lion at Ngala Tented Camp in South Africa. This was captured on our last day of safari, what a great way to close out that portion of our trip!Leslie Siegel – Our safari to Tanzania and Uganda was absolutely amazing! The people and animals are incredible! We took over 3,000 photos – such wonderful memories!Todd Mahaffey – Baby hippos weight about 100 pounds and while they can suckle underwater they cannot swim.
Kevin Allen – In Kenya’s Amboseli National Park, we watched two female lions and five cubs one evening. This cub was the most adventurous as it frequently wandered further away from the others.Darlene Knott – We had a brand new experience on the Mara when our guides took us to a jackal den where there were 5 tiny jackal puppies. We truly felt incredibly lucky to be witnessing their interactions.Carol Bailey – Our driver, BK, from Mombo Camp in Botswana noticed warning signals from a herd of Impalas and we went into the bushes, expecting to see a leopard. Instead we found this African wildcat family (there were 4 kittens).
Richard Berlin – A pride of lions resting as dads were babysitting and moms were out hunting. This is the famous white lion cub born to a pride at Ngala Tented Camp in the Kruger National Park.Kevin Allen – In Tarangire National Park, we were watching a leopard move to a dense rock formation. To our surprise this baby appeared and was visible for less than fifteen seconds and then disappeared into the bushes.David Rosenfeld – Watching this desert elephant, it was amazing to see the love and protection provided by the mother with her trunk around the baby. Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp, Namibia.
Todd Mahaffey – The gestation period for a zebra is a year and foals weigh 70 pounds at birth.David N. – This young cheetah family with six cubs were under constant observation by Conservancy staff as most don’t survive. Our guides provided in-depth commentary on their development. Mara North Conservancy, Kenya.Kevin Allen – Upon arriving late in the afternoon in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania, our safari guide drove to this large pond. The mom and baby arrived, walked in to the water, got a drink, and continued their journey.
Bruce Gould – A zebra’s striped coat disperses more than 70% of incoming heat from the unrelenting African sun. In addition to keeping cool, the stripes serve as camouflage from predators. Serengeti N.P. Tanzania.Cathy Wasserman – We began tracking the rhino thru the bush. It was an exciting off road experience. Etosha Heights Private Reserve, Namibia.