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2019, Birds
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First Place Birds: Darlene Knott - The white-fronted bee eater is one of the most colorful birds of Africa. It’s fascinating watching them spot an insect, fly up from their perch, catch the flying insect and return to their perch.Second Place Birds: Chris Swindal - The white-backed vulture has a specialized beak that assists it on tearing apart animal carcasses. Naboisho Conservancy, Kenya.Third Place Birds: Michael Ferrucci - The fish eagles of Botswana are reminiscent of our American bald eagles. Their majestic wingspan, keen eyesight, and command of the sky left no doubt they don’t have any trouble finding food for their brood.
Erik Meyers – We spotted this lilac-breasted roller in an acacia tree and took a picture just as she was going to fly away. We were amazed by the incredible number of bird species we saw on this trip. Serengeti, Tanzania.Mark Knott – Several young lion cubs were playing ‘keep away’ with this wildebeest tail. When they momentarily dropped it this tawny eagle swooped in and flew off with their prize. Serengeti, Tanzania.Susan Glessner – During our visit to the Cape Point National Park we watched African penguins. They can hold their breath for over 2 minutes and dive over 400 feet. They may eat up to 1 pound of food a day. ‘You’re it!’
Traci Greenberg – It wasn’t until I got home and uploaded my photos to my computer that I discovered that I had captured the Little Bee Eater actually eating a bee. Never overlook the little things you see on safari!Chris Swindal – The scavengers descended on a cheetah Thomson's gazelle kill. It was a battle between jackal and vulture for the remaining scraps. Naboisho Conservancy, Kenya.Mark Knott – I’m impressed by the pied kingfishers ability to hover over water as they search for small fish. This images shows the still head and body and the blurred motion of the fluttering wings.
Susan Glessner – In addition to catching its own prey, tawny eagle will also steal food from other raptors. Moremi Reserve, Botswana.Alex Kostich – This little bee-eater was perched on some branches right outside our tent and I was charmed by the proportions.  He stuck around a while, perhaps looking for bees, so I was able to really focus and get a 'money shot'.Binita Kwankin – A quiet morning at the Mashatu photography hide.  Guinea fowl darted around, pecking in the dust and stopping to drink. The morning light hit the dust, providing a nice background to their striking colors.
Alex Kostich – The Southern carmine bee-eater is not easily photographed.  If they're not flying away, they're turned away from camera-but this moment was all but perfect and I clicked away... it's my money shot of the trip!Jennifer Egsgard – Vultures are the undertakers of the African savannah, feeding primarily on the carcasses of large mammals. We witnessed this feeding frenzy during our Tanzanian safari.Kerstyn Countryman – The call of a tawny eagle is a crow-like barking sound. These eagles live throughout north and southern Africa.
Hugh Stevens – With our guide Mkenda, we walked along the shore of the Lake Ndutu admiring the birds when something spooked these two and they took flight.  I like the symmetry of the birds’ positions and their reflections on the water.Michael Ferrucci – The brown-hooded kingfisher (Halcyon albiventris) responded to my call with his over-the-shoulder glance. He soon got back to more important bird matters in the fishing waters of Tanzania.Susan Glessner – Lilac-breasted rollers are the national birds for Kenya and Botswana. The male and female birds are alike in color. Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe.
Barbara Kligerman – The 4 yellow-billed storks were lined up at Lake Manyara National Park, Tanzania as if they knew the routine of a photo-op.  Fascinating was how the first one was kneeling.Michael Ferrucci – Oh how I love the Love Birds of Tanzania! I got very lucky here shooting six frames per second on my new DSLR.Darlene Knott – In the Central Serengeti, we watched this tawny eagle posing with feathers all fluffed up in a thorny acacia tree. The contrast of the soft, beautiful feathers and the long sharp thorns of the acacia made for a wonderful photo opportunity.
Kerstyn Countryman – The lilac-breasted roller is my favorite bird in Africa. They are absolutely stunning and they move really fast so to get pictures of them flying is extremely difficult!  I took this on the way to the airstrip to head home.Michael Ferrucci – Before returning to our camp in the central Serengeti, we noticed a male and female ostrich flirting and dancing. Their engagement was brief, but based on the looks on their faces obviously very satisfying.Chuck Kossman – Lilac-breasted roller with a dung beetle in its beak. Ruaha National Park, Tanzania.
Leonard Kuo – I caught this Bateleur eagle flying by the moon just before sundowners in the Maasai Mara. These majestic eagles hunt other birds, small reptiles, small mammals and insects. They can also scavenge on small carcasses.Binita Kwankin – This photo was taken at the Mashatu photography hide. The sun had risen casting strong shadows and this guinea fowl walked in front of a patch of shadow, which allowed me to underexpose to accent the dark background.Darlene Knott – This beautiful dark chanting goshawk with the finely patterned underparts and brilliantly colored beak was on the search for food. He scanned the area for birds, reptiles, and smaller mammals in the Northern Serengeti.
Kerstyn Countryman – This little owl was a little bigger than the lilac-breasted roller and that is at full grown! These guys are super cute!Jennifer Stopher – Hornbills are characterized by their long, down-curved bill. They cannot swallow food caught at the tip of their beak so they toss it back in their throat with a jerk of their head.Cathy Code – African lovebirds are native to the forests and savannahs of Sub-Sahara Africa and Madagascar. These colorful birds mate for life.
Chuck Bevins – On a delightful morning game drive at MalaMala Private Game Reserve we were treated to the wonderful sight and iconic call of a woodland kingfisher.Becky Douglas – A dark chanting goshawk looks for prey. These birds of prey have a diet of mammals, birds and reptiles.Todd Mahaffey – Bee-eaters are colorful with 26 different species, most of which are found in Africa. As their name suggests, little bee-eaters have a diet of insects, mainly bees, wasps and hornets.
John Lotshaw – Southern ground hornbill are carnivorous and have a diet ranging from insects to small animals. They can grow as tall as 4 feet 3 inches and have a wing span to almost 6 feet. Serengeti, Tanzania.David Fleisig – I saw the lilac-breasted roller sitting on a tree stump, took multiple pictures at 1/1,000 of a second and was lucky enough to catch it taking flight.Darlene Knott – We have seen the black headed heron before but never as close as we did in the Northern Serengeti. I was delighted to capture the beautiful details of this elegant bird posing so nicely on the termite mound for me!
Ann Slaughter – Lilac-breasted rollers get their name from their impressive courtship flight – a fast, shallow dive from considerable elevation with a rolling motion accompanied by loud raucous calls. Chobe National Park, Botswana.Chuck Bevins – On our first morning game drive leaving Rattray's Camp at MalaMala we spotted a crested barbet enjoying breakfast of a wooden fence post.Darlene Knott – In Tanzania’s Northern Serengeti, we spotted this brilliantly hued yellow-billed stork diligently hunting for frogs. I am sure he was quite successful!
Alex Kostich – This African hoopoe was a huge 'get,' they are somewhat rare and not very still. A friend of mine has a hoopoe tattoo'd on his forearm, and I was obsessed with capturing a photograph to share with him.John Lotshaw – A group of great white pelicans in the Ngorogoro Crater.  Note the pastel colors around their heads.Todd Mahaffey – African green-pigeons are gregarious and are found in small groups. They forage in tree and are particularly fond of figs.
Barbara Kligerman – The lilac-breasted roller in Tarangire National Park, Tanzania posed as a model, as I never could have gotten this when in a tumbling courtship display flight.Carol Bailey – Helmeted guinea fowl seem to be everywhere in Africa.  This bird has a nickname of ‘Chobe Chicken’ in Chobe National Park, Botswana.Chuck Bevins – On an afternoon game drive at MalaMala we spotted this greater blue-eared starling. These striking birds feast on seeds, berries and insects.
Evelyn Willis – A family of tawny eagles (mother, father and juvenile) perched on top of an acacia tree in the Serengeti National Park. They all seem to be spotting the same thing!Brad Nichols – I’m not sure if this saddle billed stork was hunting or enjoying its reflection. Chitabe Lediba Camp. Botswana.David Rosenfeld – During our time at Hoanib Skeleton Coast Camp in Namibia we loved the desert background of the marching ostriches all facing in the same direction.