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2018, Wildlife
Click on image for caption
First Place Wildlife: Mark Knott - We left Rattray’s Camp before dawn, intending to have our morning Amarula coffee while viewing the sunrise from the top of a kopje. Shortly after leaving camp we came across 2 of the dominant male lions of the area.Second Place Wildlife: Michael Maloon - We were fortunate to see several leopards during our time at the Mashatu Game Reserve including this female standing on a tree trunk. Leopards are solitary and typically come together to mate.Third Place Wildlife: Helen Reinhardt - We watched these two male hippos fight for over an hour. One was the resident ruler of the pond. The second one was an intruder male looking to take over another’s territory. Okavango Delta, Botswana.
Karen Sharpe - During our time in the Ngorongoro Crater, this male was lounging in the sun while one of his lionesses and her cub sought the shade of our vehicle, resting against a tire.Carrie Burhenn - It was an exciting game drive as one of the female elephants repeatedly trumpeted loudly while this big male calmly walked right up to our vehicle. Mana Pools, Zimbabwe.Darlene Knott - We set out with Joe, our enthusiastic guide at MalaMala, early one morning and saw these rhino. They were positioned perfectly with the sun rising behind them. The colors were spectacular!
Terry Gray -On our very first game drive in Chitabe, we were fortunate to see this lovely female leopard. She had stashed her impala kill and was resting after eating. Probably my favorite shot of the trip! Okavango Delta, Botswana.Chris Swindal - We tracked and found this wild dog pack of 8 adults and 9 puppies. The pack got split up and after a day apart, they reunited and a happy and very vocal greeting ceremony followed. Kwando Splash Camp, Botswana.Eric Gurwin - We were very fortunate to spend quite a bit of time with a mother and her two sub-adult cheetah cubs. Their play, which I’m sure is fun, is also a way to hone their hunting skills.
Eric Gurwin - There were a pair of bull elephants picking up water with their trunks and spraying themselves and the air. Using a Nikon D5 at 10fps and a shutter speed of 1/1250s I was able to get the image you see here.Chris Swindal - This lioness used the moving and unafraid elephants as cover as they crept closer to red lechwe. After this photo, the lionesses brought down one of the two fighting male red lechwes. Duba Plains, Botswana.Eric Gurwin - We had a good suspicion that when this leopard awoke it would drink from the nearby water. We were very close, within fifteen feet and were lucky to capture some images as it indeed did quench its thirst.
Dylan Lee - It's amazing how close a breeding herd will allow you to get while you're canoeing on the Zambezi River. We floated around this herd for more than 20 minutes while they fed on island grasses. Mana Pools, Zimbabwe.Michael Maloon - Built for speed, the cheetah is the planet’s fastest land mammal and has been clocked at over 60 miles per hour. Mashatu Game Reserve, Botswana.Eric Gurwin - As night was falling this leopard decided it prudent to hoist her kill....she went from tree to tree before deciding which to use. I felt converting this image to black and white made the image more moody.
Mary Ellen Cvek -This is one of two somewhat unique sightings in the Tswalu Kalahari Game Reserve, South Africa, all during the same memorable evening. First this aardvark, followed later that evening by an elusive pangolin.Chris Swindal - After a thrilling couple of minutes with the four white rhinos in close proximity, they gave us one final look and decided to keep moving on. Okavango Delta, Botswana.Helen Reinhardt - During our time in Botswana’s Okavango Delta, we watched as the wild dog pack went out hunting. Every individual is always looking in the distance for potential prey.
Steve Gershwind - During our time in the northern Serengeti we were able to witness the thrill of the wildebeest crossing the Mara River. The crossing is treacherous with large crocodiles waiting to make a kill.Nancy Lind - There was speculation that this lioness was in the tree to escape the advances of some unwelcomed males new to the territory. Qorokwe Camp, Okavango Delta, Botswana.Ronnie Cantor - Tintswalo Safari Lodge sets up a water hose in a tree. To the elephants, the tree ‘magically’ makes water. To us, the tree provides hours of magical entertainment watching them come in to drink. Manyaleti, South Africa.
Eric Gurwin - In what was an amazing morning we came about a ‘crash’ of rhino. If that wasn’t amazing in itself, they lined themselves up in such a way that I couldn’t have imagined. MalaMala Game Reserve, South Africa.David and Katrina McIntyre - We found this cheetah off the road at Lion Sands Ivory Lodge, South Africa. The ‘tear marks’ help reflect the glare of the sun when hunting.Darlene Knott - With incredible senses, they were alerted to an animal in the far distance. Thanks to our friend and guide, Dickson Dube, we spent many hours being entertained by these wild dogs. Hwange, Zimbabwe.
Darlene Knott - We followed this leopard at Mashatu for quite a while. Finally she climbed the ridge and surveyed the area. The light was perfect and so was the sighting! Mashatu Game Reserve, Botswana.JP Norvell - The highlight of our 4-week trip was the Maasai Mara and witnessing the great wildebeest migration. This picture was taken while we were waiting for thousands of wildebeests to cross a river.Dave Reilly - We learned so many interesting facts from our wonderful Tanzanian guide, Jabshir, such as elephant tusks can grow up to seven inches a year. Tusks are teeth and no two are alike.
JP Norvell - Our trip to Madagascar was mind-blowing on many levels, but certainly the highlight was interacting with lemurs, which must be the most interesting animal.Terry Gray - Wild dogs on a hunt at Chitabe Camp in Botswana’s Okavango Delta. We followed this pack of wild dogs through the sands of Chitabe during their evening hunt.Nancy Lind - This unwelcomed male lion was looking for a female to mate with and literally chased her up a tree. (See photo #20 for the female). Qorokwe Camp, Okavango Delta, Botswana.
Carrie Burhenn - In Johannesburg we arrived at the Ann van Dyk Cheetah Centre in time to photograph a cheetah getting its daily exercise of running for its breakfast, part of the successful rehabilitation program at the centre.Eric Gurwin - Another amazing encounter. I was permitted to leave the vehicle and photograph the white rhino on foot. There is nothing better than getting images from a low level and shooting from one knee allowed me this image.Stuart Hahn - After numerous African safaris, I tried to get something a little different. An interesting fact is that an elephant’s height can be estimated by the size of its footprint.
Stuart Hahn - These baboons visited the waterhole at a hide at Mashatu Game Reserve. I noticed the group with their reflection in the water as they came to drink. A troop of baboons typically ranges in size between 20-80 individuals.Nils Jacobsen - Tranquility, if you are a Cape buffalo - is to have your nose pecked by the symbiotic ‘resident’ - the red oxpecker - whose sole job function is to keep your hide free of insects and other infestations.Stuart Hahn - These elephants are coming down to visit a Mashatu water hole. ‘I like the nice grouping and low perspective. This low perspective is one of the benefits of using a hide.’
Darlene Knott - We have been in Hwange National Park many times and have always enjoyed the game viewing. But, never had we seen the wild dogs there! This pack of wild dogs put on such a show for us.Mary Lippold -This gorgeous lioness was one of the last wildlife sightings of our safari. She blended into the grass, basking in the warm sun as we were driving to the air strip just about to start our long trip toward home.Christine Kraus - ‘Not another herd of impala’...Fortunately, our guide suggested we wait a few more minutes because he thought these two were going to fight. A good guide is priceless. Thanks Samwell! Serengeti, Tanzania.
Nils Jacobsen - On the opposite bank, just across from the Sable Camp, this mama leopard gave its cub a stare down after the cub botched a stakeout and scared off the anticipated ‘lunch’. MalaMala Game Reserve, South Africa.Dave Reilly - The tallest member of the animal kingdom, giraffe are selective browsers favoring various species of acacia and ziziphus. Some plants have evolved chemical defenses and release unpalatable tannins when over-browsed.Mark Knott - Our guide suggested we try ‘night’ photography. With the rising sun and the guide’s careful use of a light we were able to get this amazing photo. MalaMala Game Reserve, South Africa.
Eric Gurwin - Almost blocking out the sun this elephant bull gave me an opportunity of a lifetime. I was on foot and the bull approached me in a non-threatening way. Because of how close the elephant was I took it with an iPhone.Kami Banko - The guide said this Nile crocodile was ‘cooling its brain’, but to me it looks like he is laughing at the funniest tourists he’d ever seen. Chobe National Park, Botswana.Terry Gray - During our time in the Linyanti Reserve, we watched a pack of wild dogs. While the others had gone to hunt, this wild dog stayed behind to puppy-sit the pack's 12 little ones. DumaTau Camp, Botswana.
Dave Reilly - Cheetahs favor open habitats where gazelle, medium-sized antelope and hares are the principle prey. The higher grass makes hunting a definite challenge.Chris Swindal - This giraffe had several dozen ox peckers lined up and standing on the back of its neck. The giraffe was craning and stretching its neck and seemed to be enjoying it. Kwando Lagoon, Botswana.Chris Swindal - One morning during my time at the Okavango Delta we spotted four white rhinos together. Four!! We got our cameras as low as possible. The rhinos seemed to get curious and came closer to give us a good look.
Chris Swindal - We found this male on patrol, calling and warning four young males to stay out of his territory. He made it to an open plain scattered with red lechwe and surveyed his territory. Okavango Delta, Botswana.JP Norvell - Chameleons have unique anatomical adaptations including eyes that swivel independently and can look in two places without moving their heads. Andasibe, Madagascar.JP Norvell - In Zimbabwe’s Mana Pools, our guide took us to see ‘Fred Astaire’, a celebrity elephant who has figured out to stretch up on his hind legs to reach its favorite tree branches.
Kami Banko - A young female leopard climbed up a dead tree to scout out a snack in the Okavango Delta. Moments later he jumped into the next tree and caught a squirrel.Karl Newmeyer - On our second day of Uganda gorilla trekking, we spent our hour with an active family of at least fifteen gorillas. One mature adult male walked between my wife and another trekker, so close that his leg brushed against her pants!Dave Reilly - The Great Migration includes over 1.5 million wildebeest, 200,000 zebra and other antelope. The animals travel in a circle from the southern Serengeti north into Kenya’s Maasai Mara.
Helen Reinhardt - We were fortunate enough to see two different packs of wild dogs while on the MalaMala Game Reserve. This dog stopped to rest as we followed the pack running down the road.Harry Rogers - Female cheetah are solitary and do not have fixed territories whereas male cheetah are territorial and occupy large areas and more females to mate with.Terry Gray - This large white rhino had apparently been in a scuffle not long ago, suffering a horn slash to the face. The horn of a rhino is made up of keratin, a protein found in hair and fingernails. Sabi Sands, South Africa.
Dave Reilly - Traveling on safari through northern Tanzania in May brought many surprises, including photographing lions surrounded by wild flowers.Mary Ellen Cvek - Seemingly posing for a picture, this is a member of the habituated colony of meerkats that we were able to observe, up close and personal, in the Tswalu Kalahari Game Reserve, South Africa.Stuart Hahn - Between our game drives at Mashatu Game Reserve we enjoyed time in the waterhole hide. Our guide shared interesting facts of the pachyderm such as an elephant’s trunk contains over 40,000 muscles.
Dave Reilly - Leopards are most active at night but will readily slink down the trunk of a tree at midday to take advantage of a hunting opportunity.Mark Knott - Usually the dogs are the ones doing the chasing, but this time we watched as a small herd of wildebeest turned the situation around and chased a small pack of wild dogs. Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe.Ronnie Cantor - It was a privilege to see these black rhinos up close and personal. They are massive and imposing, yet it’s that piercing stare that lets you know who’s the boss.
Steve Gershwind - Cheetah hunt during the day to avoid conflict with other predators such as lions, hyenas and leopards. Maasai Mara, Kenya.Nils Jacobsen - We saw two packs of wild dogs (13+) after a kill joining in a social greeting. A stray hyena wanted to join the party but the dogs wanted none of that and it found safe refuge in the lake.JP Norvell - We spent over a month in Africa and saw too many incredible sights to count, but the Maasai Mara was by far our favorite. Taken one morning as we watched a male and female lion during their ‘honeymoon’.
Nils Jacobsen -- This warthog and his family provide ‘lawn service’ at Tanda Tula Safari Camp. They stayed inside or in proximity of the camp for protection against predators. Timbavati Game Reserve, South Africa.Helen Reinhardt - Leopard eyes are beautiful! We spent about an hour with this young female.Dylan Hargreaves - Massive herd of wildebeest crossing the Mara River during the great migration in the northern Serengeti.
David and Katrina McIntyre - This was our first gorilla and he was the silverback from the Susa Group. We had been trekking for over 3 hours by the time we found the group. It was so worth it. Volcanoes NP, Rwanda.David and Katrina McIntyre - Our last game drive at Chitabe Camp we witnessed this lion pride pursuing an unwelcomed lioness that had crossed into their territory. Okavango Delta, Botswana.JP Norvell - A ruffed lemur posing perfectly for us. Lemurs are confined to the island of Madagascar, where up to 100 species are recognized.
Dave Reilly - Despite their long necks, giraffe have seven vertebrae in their neck - the same number of bones humans have in their necks.JP Norvell - A highlight was witnessing the Great Migration. Here the wildebeests have crossed the river and are desperately trying to climb up the embankment, often falling and striking down the unlucky wildebeests below like a bowling ball.Carrie Burhenn - This elephant herd made sure to keep an eye on our safari vehicle, creating a beautiful wildlife scene at sunset in Botswana’s Kwando Lagoon.
Bill Harker - A termite mound provides ambush opportunities for leopards in Kenya’s Maasai Mara.Mark Knott - We were in the hide at Mashatu and a beautiful black backed jackal trotted in. We were not sure if he was more interested in us or the dove. The ground level view from this waterhole hide is amazing.Dave Reilly - Lions love to sleep and females can spend 15-18 hours a day sleeping. Males can sleep up to 18 hours (the females are busy hunting and taking care of cubs). Tarangire National Park, Tanzania.
Terry Gray - This big boy interrupted his jousting with another big male to bellow out a warning for us to not get any closer! And we sure didn't! Chitabe Camp, Okavango Delta, Botswana.Madeline Maloon - The Tswalu Kalahari Reserve is a wonderful place to view meerkats. They are opportunistic hunters and have a diet of beetles, spiders, scorpions and lizards.Helen Reinhardt - An adolescent male and female lion reunited with three other females. We witnessed three females cross the water to reunite with the others. It was thrilling! Rambunctious play ensued when they were together.
Bill Harker - The Selous Game Reserve is the largest game reserve in Africa and is four times larger than the Serengeti. Travelers experience the thrill of walking safaris, off-road game drives and boating.Terry Gray - We spotted this beautiful girl in a tree with her kill. Her eyes are mesmerizing! Kirkman’s Kamp, Sabi Sand Private Game Reserve, South Africa.Mark Knott - The hide at Mashatu is a great place to observe all types of wildlife and birds at close range. These baboons took the opportunity to drink while others watched for danger.
Stuart Hahn - This photo was taken as we canoed down the Zambezi River from Mana Pools in Zimbabwe. This is a big male enjoying some hyacinth and the photo was taken from a low vantage point.Mark Knott - Sable antelope are beautiful and a rather uncommon. A stormy sky over Hwange National Park provided a great background for this herd as it ran toward a waterhole for a quick drink.Laurie Mattenson - The lion was a pair of brothers we watched and followed during our stay at Phinda Forest Lodge - they had been napping and grooming each other then went to get a drink (just like our cats at home!).
Michael Maloon - We were fortunate to see several pangolins during our time on the Tswalu Kalahari Reserve. Pangolins are the most illegally traded animal in the world and considered critically endangered.Chet Stein - We watched the ‘Five Brothers’ coordinated hunt. Wildebeests ran away from one, but right into the other four that had fanned out and hidden. Within seconds they took down three wildebeests. Maasai Mara, Kenya.Michael Maloon - While watching from Mashatu’s photographic hide, this warthog finally got his nerve up to take a drink from the waterhole. Masahtu Game Reserve, Botswana.
Laurie Mattenson - During our time at MalaMala we had the delight to see several leopard, including this female. MalaMala Game Reserve, Sabi Sand, South Africa.Ronnie Cantor - Our first aardvark after 15 Safaris! At Tswalu Motse Lodge, it was a thrill to follow this aardvark on foot as it wandered through the underbrush seeking its favorite food-termites. Tswalu Kalahari, South Africa.Carrie Burhenn - Heading out on our dawn safari in Mana Pools, a large bull elephant walked over to check us out, then casually reached up into the acacia trees looking as if he was trying to touch the sun. Vundu Camp, Zimbabwe.
Lenny Roberts - This cheetah was taken in our first hour ever on safari. We landed at the Splash Camp airstrip and were immediately taken to the area where the cheetah had been spotted (literally)! Okavango Delta, Botswana.Mark Knott - An amazing display of strength, ferocity and quickness by the huge animals. Fortunately the weaker bull retreated before serious damage could be done.Chet Stein - The contemplative leopard was seen in the northern Serengeti. The rock kopjes provide an ideal lookout for prey.
Darlene Knott - We found the wild dogs hanging around the wildebeests when the wildebeests decided they felt harassed and were not going to take it anymore! They started chasing the dogs! We laughed as this wild dog ran away!Carol Kahn - I took this in a blind at Mashatu in Botswana. My daughter, granddaughter and I thoroughly enjoyed ourselves viewing the elephants over several hours. One group of elephants got into perfect position and I took it on my iPhone.Dylan Lee - In Hwange, we tracked a black rhino and her calf. We found them along with a male they'd met up with (this is the mother). There are seven black rhino in all of Hwange, and we discovered three of them.
Julie Neuburger - After four days of tracking her, we finally found the local leopard lounging in a tree on our last day in Botswana. Vumbura Plains Camp, Okavango Delta, Botswana.Evan Ray - At a brief stop to watch a family this baboon looked at me with such interesting eyes I could not help but shoot the picture as close as possible to try and capture the mesmerizing look. Northern Serengeti, Tanzania.Anne Vallotton - Alpha male begins the morning hunt. No success, but it was fascinating watching how they worked, stopping for scents and quickly changing directions when something was nearby. Kwando Lagoon, Botswana.
Janis Webb - As we were returning to camp one evening, we came across these male giraffes fighting. Seeing them with the sun setting behind them and the full moon low in the sky behind was special. Maasai Mara, Kenya.Dave Reilly - Whatever the motivation for a lion to climb up a tree, their skills contrast sharply to the agility of a leopard. Tarangire, Tanzania.Helen Reinhardt - We watched this pack of 22 wild dogs wake up, greet each other, and take off hunting. When they reached the edge of the water they stopped, concerned about crocodiles, which kept them from crossing.
Christy Russ - We tracked the rare Namibia desert adapted elephants and after two hours, we were able to find this one male elephant. He eventually brought us to a group of more than 15 elephants of various ages. It was truly magical!Terry Gray - We spotted this mother cheetah and her 3 cubs enjoying their morning rest with full bellies during a game drive from Chitabe Camp. Okavango Delta, Botswana.Shirley Klein - We were surrounded by thousands of wildebeest during the Great Migration which was in the southern Serengeti this past December.
Karl Newmeyer - During the first of our two gorilla treks in Bwindi National Park in Uganda. Our wonderful guides and porters led us to a family of nine gorillas, including this peaceful napping mom and her youngsters.Candace Premo - During our second day in the Serengeti we stopped to watch the giraffe cross the road in front of our car. Watching giraffes walk through the vast African plains was one of the greatest experiences.Anne Vallotton - The leopard is referred to as ‘The Fisherman’. Unlike most leopards, he keeps his kill on the ground near the marsh where he hunts, hence the name ‘Fisherman’. Kwando Lebala Camp, Botswana.
David Pinkernell - Lounging on the deck chairs in front of Somalisa Expedition Camp’s water hole, I snapped this panorama of Carrie taking close ups of a herd of elephants relieving their thirst during the heat of the day.Harry Rogers - Each cheetah has unique spot patterns on the face, body and tail. This can help guides and researchers identify them out in the field.Laurie Mattenson - We spent a fabulous afternoon watching the wildlife come and go from the hide at Mashatu Game Reserve in Botswana. These zebra stayed focused on our cameras while drinking.
Anna Ingram - Throughout our safari we had several white rhino sightings but because the black rhino is a critically endangered species, we came to the conclusion that we would most likely not see one, and boy were we wrong! Sabi Sand, South Africa.Joseph Pangelinan - Our Serengeti balloon safari almost landed on this pride of five lions and the pilot had to extend our landing spot. After landing we hopped in the vehicle and went to find the pride. What an adventure!Laurie Mattenson - This elephant was thoroughly enjoying his wallow in the Mashatu waterhole. The hide gave us a unique perspective and wonderful photographic opportunities. Mashatu Game Reserve, Botswana.
Madeline Maloon - This young pangolin actually walked across Madeline's foot during her safari in the Tswalu Kalahari Reserve. Pangolins are solitary, primarily nocturnal and prefer a diet of ants and other insects.Karl Newmeyer - Our guide Jackson at ol Donyo in Kenya was endlessly patient and helpful with photography tips. Getting this early morning hillside shot of two young cheetah brothers was a highlight!Jerry Kovar - We bought a new zoom camera before our trip, thinking we would need it for animals we'd see off in the distance, never imagining we'd get so close to so many! We loved looking in their eyes. MalaMala, South Africa.
David Leschensky - This photo was taken near the Ngorongoro Crater by our 11 year old son David early in our safari trip. We drove upon a massive herd of elephants and David snapped this photo of a young elephant.Darlene Knott - I have been watching the Three Rivers female at MalaMala as a tiny cub 2 years before. Her mother died less than a year later, and the daughter has proven to be a survivor, hunting successfully and evading predators!Lisa Schwerdt -Seeing black rhino was a particular interest of mine, so I was very happy we encountered a mother with baby in an open clearing where we had quite a lengthy opportunity to study them. Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe.
Dave Reilly - A number of destinations in Africa have sightings of tree climbing lions including Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth NP, Botswana’s Savuti region and Tanzania’s Serengeti and Tarangire (pictured).Terry Gray - This pack of wild dog stopped at a small waterhole for a brief rest and drink. Wild dogs are one of the world’s most endangered mammals. Okavango Delta, Botswana.Dave Reiner -Late in our evening game drive at Mashatu Game Reserve in Botswana, our savvy guide picked out a fleeting glint of eyes in the spotlight. The look in this leopard’s eyes was unwavering and unmistakable!
Lisa Schwerdt - Serengeti National Park, the Hippo Pool. I’ve never seen so many hippos gathered in one place! We watched this one appear on the bank, and clamber on down into the pool.Diana Leferovich - Among the dry areas of Kenya’s Amboseli National Park was an oasis where many of the animals were feeding and drinking.Kathy Bernau - This picture captured the majesty of the lioness while also reflecting the landscape. The termite hills are part of the barrenness but on reflection, they contribute significantly to the ecosystem. Moremi Reserve, Botswana.
Lauren Zimmerman - This photo of a male elephant was taken on my last morning in Kenya’s Amboseli National Park. It's so peaceful just to sit and watch elephants. I could easily do that all day!Laurie Mattenson - This photo was taken at the Mashatu Game Reserve and their photo hide. A giraffe’s neck is too short to reach the ground so they have to awkwardly spread its front legs.Karl Newmeyer - During our orientation for Uganda gorilla trekking, our guide said, ‘Go ahead, make eye contact with the gorillas.’ We had heard not to, but he encouraged us, saying if we were respectful and aware that we were in their home, it was fine.
Lenny Roberts - On our last day of safari we left the lodge at MalaMala Sable Camp and immediately came upon the hippopotamus with the crocodile on its back. We were excited when our guide spotted them.Shirley Klein - ‘Lions sleep a lot but these two in Tarangire National Park seem bored.’ It is believed that lions climb trees to get away from tsetse flies and seek shade from the African heat.Iffat Khan -Before dawn, we accompanied the pair on their leisurely stroll. After crossing the water the lions walked towards us, split, walked next to our vehicle, one on each side, rendezvousing at the other end. MalaMala, South Africa.
Laura Sullivan - Our safari to Botswana’s Mashatu Game Reserve was thrilling! We thoroughly enjoyed our time spent in their photographic hide where we had the opportunity to capture unique photos.Helen Reinhardt - We spotted this leopard under a bush, where she had dragged her kill. Our guide said when it cooled down she would probably come out to get a drink. In perfect golden light she did just that!! It was beautiful!Helen Reinhardt - During our time at Chitabe Lediba we found the pack of 22 wild dog where they have 9 babies that survived out of an original 15 pups. Now about 4-5 months old, they accompany the adults for hunts.
Tom Walend - We spent an afternoon in the Mashatu photographic hide which was pure magic! Boy, did we see elephants. We got tired of counting at 200. Who could resist those eyelashes?Bill Webb - We had been watching a mating pair of leopards when they disappeared into the bushes. While taking our lunch break, we looked up and there in the tree canopy was the female watching us.David and Katrina McIntyre -This gorilla was resting right next to the path we had to follow. She was just watching us and looked straight at me. Seeing the gorillas is one of the most amazing things I have done in Africa.
Graeme Nye - During the ‘Elephant Experience’ at Stanley’s Camp I asked to see the soles of an elephant’s foot. Female elephant ‘Marula’ obliged with her front foot showing her superb ‘tread’.Greg Illes - The lizards that inhabit Namibia’s Matobo boulders have an uncanny ability to squeeze into hiding places. This one fit into a crack no thicker than a pencil while he watched us, ready to disappear in an instant.Dylan Lee - An unseen commotion had us set off on foot and found this lioness that had stolen the impala dinner of a pack of painted dogs. We kneeled down, the 14 dogs yelping for their kill back, two jackals and growling lion.